Of bisons and riddles

A book I own contains the following fully grammatical sentence: Buffalo buffalo Buffalo buffalo buffalo buffalo Buffalo buffalo.  My friend Susan was the only one who immediately asked, “Where’s the verb?”  One of my students reacted the way I did when I first saw the sentence: “Why do you have 8 buffaloes in a row?”  Think… More Of bisons and riddles

Subjunctivitis: Interlude (Subjunctive of Nagging)

“You were to finish this write-up last night – in fact, you should have finished it!”  An expression of frustrated will, nagging in Latin is a borderline case between will and wish.  In his New Latin Syntax, E. C. Woodcock discusses the use of imperfect and pluperfect subjunctive in a jussive sense (sections 110-111, 116),… More Subjunctivitis: Interlude (Subjunctive of Nagging)

Subjunctivitis: Diagnosis and Treatment (Subjunctive of Will)

(I posted this one on the Novice Corner page but it takes too long to scroll down and find it.)  So – the Latin subjunctive. Verbs tell you a lot, so get used to examining them asap. Let’s first review the moods we’ve covered so far. Indicative mood If you want to present the action… More Subjunctivitis: Diagnosis and Treatment (Subjunctive of Will)

Quod putavi et praemonui fit – bewilderment is a mighty force

Teaching is a great way to discover gaps in your understanding.  Here is the sentence I read without a hitch but have difficulty explaining because of the nomenclature.  Pompey is writing to Ahenobarbus about Caesar’s wicked vise: Quod putavi et praemonui fit ut nec in praesentia committere proelium tecum velit et omnibus copiis conductis penitus te… More Quod putavi et praemonui fit – bewilderment is a mighty force